Medical Malpractice Situation Jeopardizes Surgeon’s License

Dr. Osakatukei “Osak” Omulepu is facing more than just medical malpractice and personal injury lawsuits. The South Carolina Department of Health has contacted South Carolina’s Board of Medicine, requesting that hey revoke the plastic surgeon’s medical license, making it impossible for him to perform any more potentially dangerous surgeries.

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Earlier in his career, Dr. Omulepu worked for South Carolina’s Spectrum-Aesthetics Center for Cosmetic Surgery and Vanity Cosmetic Surgery. Both establishments state that he is no longer a member of the staff nor does he perform and surgeries at the facilities.

Question about Omulepu’s competency rose when several patients who wanted the plastic surgeon to perform a procedure called a butt lift were hospitalized for complications in May 2015. All of these women’s surgeries took place during a 3-day time frame.

Its data shows that breast surgery, facelifts, eyelid operations and weight-loss procedures account for 80% of the rising number of legal actions, with blunders leading to damages payouts of more than £500,000. This become one of the most lucrative branch of industry.

Each of the patient’s complications differed in severity. According to hospital records, two of the women experienced torn internal organs (small intestines, liver), which led to additional complications such as blood infections. One woman developed acute respiratory and kidney failure.

State records show that at the time of the incidents, Omulepu failed to have a current medical malpractice insurance policy in place, which could limit the legal options available to the patients.

brazilian-butt-liftAn investigation revealed that the three patients in May aren’t the only ones whose lives have been put in danger as a result of Omulepu’s surgeries. In May 2012, a 27-year-old woman made the journey from St. Louis, Missouri to South Carolina after she’d been referred to Omulepu by the website RealSelf.com, which specializes in matching patients to cosmetic surgeons. Following her surgery, she was forced to admit herself to the emergency room on three separate occasions for leg and back infection which were connected to Omulepu’s surgeries. She reports that her travel expenses and surgical fees for the cosmetic surgery performed by Omulepu cost about $6,000. She now has over $60,000 worth of medical bills as a result of complications from the surgery. She says that following her cosmetic surgery, Omulepu avoided her phone calls.

A Texas State University student also made the trip to South Carolina for a Brazilian butt lift which was performed by Omulepu and quickly developed severe infections that required a 2 week stay in te hospital for treatments. She also reports that when the complications developed, she was unable to contact Omulepu. She is now looking for a way to cope with approximately $75,000 worth of medical bills.

Research indicates that Omulepu was never officially certified and registered with the American Board of Plastic Surgery. The case has prompted the South Carolina Society of Plastic Surgeons to remind patients who desire plastic surgery to not only thoroughly research the surgeon they’re considering using, but to also ask for referrals and to make sure they’re properly board certified as well as being a member of the American Board of Plastic Surgery.

“This is a sad story that is becoming all too common,” said Joe and Martin managing partners of a top personal injury firm in South Carolina at https://joeandmartin.com/. “It seems like every few days there’s a new story about someone who is fighting for their life as a result of a botched plastic surgery. It’s a trend that needs to stop.”

Killino admitted that the fact Omulepu wasn’t properly insured will make it harder for the women to gain the type of settlement they should be entitled to, but he encourages them to file a personal injury lawsuit anyway. Not only is there a really good chance that the lawsuit will result in a settlement, which will probably be smaller than if Omulepu had been insured, but hopefully the case will make other young women think twice before accepting treatment from a doctor who isn’t authorized to practice medicine.